Summer Smash

I rode the wave of energy granted me by some amazing supplements and thought myself free of the end-of-summer smashery but, it wasn’t to be. The problem with CFS/ME and riding the wave of energy that comes along is the inevitable payment made down the road. Instead of pacing, I gorged on activity. And the smash prevailed. But the good news? It’s none of it nearly as devastating (can’t call it devastating, in fact) as it has been in the past. When recovery is well underway, setbacks take on milder and milder hues of frustration – as long as the supplements are continuously available.

These supplements are now at the top of my absolute must list:

Virasyl (Shilajit and Humic Acid)

Bio PQQ

Vitamin K2

Ubiquinol

Acetyl L-Carnitine

R Lipoic Acid

Magnesium (topical and oral)

D-Ribose

Olive Leaf Extract

Bovine Colostrum

And a ton of amino acids. And other basics.

 

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FDA Foul

I keep meaning to put the F.D.A. on my black list here. Here’s one of the countless reasons why:

“Did you know that if a supplement company “Likes” a customer’s Facebook post, it magically transforms nutritional supplements into drugs? The same thing happens if a supplement’s website links to a scientific article!

As recently as this week, the FDA has made attacks like these to expand the agency’s definition of “disease claim.” Why? By saying a supplement makes a disease claim, the FDA can call it a “drug”—and then remove it from the market!” 

This is a quote from The Alliance for Natural Health.

Related Link Here

Acetyl L-Carnitine

…to the rescue…

Here’s why CFS/ME sufferers need to keep this one in their daily supplement routine:

“Carnitine is the carrier molecule that takes fuel in the form of acetate groups from the cell across mitochondrial membranes where it is needed to fuel energy production by Kreb’s citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Acetate groups in the cell bind to carninine to form acetyl L-carnitine, which can then pass through the mitchondrial membrane. The acetate groups is then given up and L-carnitine passes back through the mitochondrial membrane into the cell in order to pick up another molecule of acetate. Using the car analogy, carnitine is like the nozzle on the fuel pump that delivers fuel into the tank of your tank of your car where it is needed.

Carnitine can be made in both the liver and the kidney from cysteine and methionine (both amino acids in animal protein) and requires iron and vitamin C for its synthesis. In muscle meats L-carnitine makes up 0.1% of dry matter. There is very little carnitine in plant derived foods, which may partly explain why vegetarianism seems to be a risk factor for chronic fatigue.

A typical sort of dose to treat problems associated with poor mitochondrial function is 2 grams a day. Studies have shown it is highly effective in ischaemic heart disease. It has also been trialled in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome…” Dr. Sarah Myhill

Related Link Here

I take 2 grams a day WITH r-lipoic acid (this is what the body creates FROM alpha lipoic acid) in order to optimize their benefit. Ratio of 1:1. It’s an energy revolution when I’m careful not to overdo the activity. I consider these 2 supplements a daily must.

CFS and Magnesium

“Low intracellular magnesium is a symptom of CFS and a cause of it. This is because 40% of resting energy simply fires sodium/potassium (Na/K) and calcium/magnesium (Ca/Mg) membrane ion pumps. So when energy supply is diminished, there is insufficient energy to fire these pumps, so magnesium cannot be drawn into cells for oxidative phosphorylation to work, so there is a further diminishing of energy supply. This is just one of the many similar vicious cycles in CFS. Sufferers do not simply replete through taking magnesium supplements – although this must be tried! Some need magnesium by injection to get the desired result.” Dr. Sarah Myhill

Oral supplements initially provided great results for my particular situation but my starting point was so low that it was not difficult to create an improvement. I essentially went from feeling horrible whether lying down or moving around to feeling much better when resting. I’m significantly past that phase. But since my improvement has plateaued, I’ll have to up my game.

Cellular Magnesium

A few things to know…

“Salt lowers cellular magnesium.

Glucose lowers cellular magnesium.

Pregnancy lowers cellular magnesium (especially if pregnancy is complicated by diabetes).

Aging lowers cellular magnesium.

Insulin temporarily raises blood magnesium, but it causes increased magnesium loss through the urine, ultimately leading to a lowering of cellular magnesium and increase in cellular calcium.” From The Magnesium Factor – Mildred Seelig, M.D., Andrea Rosanoff, Ph.D.

Also…

Dr. Sarah Myhill recommends magnesium be taken by injection when the body is severely depleted, which is usually the case with CFS/M.E. and, if injection is not available, via nebuliser (this is my new planned approach!). Typical blood tests might not necessarily reveal whether your body is severely depleted.

Another great source for magnesium? There’s also the great magnesium oil alternatives putting it directly on the skin and into the system via absorption.