GAPS

Gut and Psychology Syndrome = GAPS

Over the summer my CFS/ME struggle became the perfect storm, tossing me into the abyss. But we can learn much in said abyss, thankfully. I learned not to take advantage of a wellness milestone but to wait for a year or two of wellness milestoneS. I learned the hard way. But along the way I’m refusing regret because the lessons learned have offered me jewels of insight I would not have been open to before the inevitable perfect storm. For one, the GAPS diet. Or, as I prefer to see it, the GAPS lifestyle. While I’m still at the beginning stages of this radical approach, I’m realizing some of the components will have to be a lifetime practice for my unique situation. Bone broths have become a must for my healing. And I’m seeing the benefits after 8 weeks in my skin and, of course, in healing my gut. For many CFS/ME sufferers one of the “sacrificial” systems the body begins to shut down or diminish support of is the gut/liver. And the body does so because blood pressure is suffering due to low cardiac output. But first, support of the skin/thyroid is diminished. Bone broths rescue both in a terrific dual bonus I know I’ll never be able to abandon.

GAPS focus, as well as the paleo, particularly anti-inflammatory, nutritional regimen brings everything down to the basics of good gut health and improved energy levels. There’s no wiser approach, in my opinion. So, for anyone curious enough or in dire need, check out the resources of gapsdiet.com as well as Weston A. Price.

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Summer Smash

I rode the wave of energy granted me by some amazing supplements and thought myself free of the end-of-summer smashery but, it wasn’t to be. The problem with CFS/ME and riding the wave of energy that comes along is the inevitable payment made down the road. Instead of pacing, I gorged on activity. And the smash prevailed. But the good news? It’s none of it nearly as devastating (can’t call it devastating, in fact) as it has been in the past. When recovery is well underway, setbacks take on milder and milder hues of frustration – as long as the supplements are continuously available.

These supplements are now at the top of my absolute must list:

Virasyl (Shilajit and Humic Acid)

Bio PQQ

Vitamin K2

Ubiquinol

Acetyl L-Carnitine

R Lipoic Acid

Magnesium (topical and oral)

D-Ribose

Olive Leaf Extract

Bovine Colostrum

And a ton of amino acids. And other basics.

 

High Intensity Exercise

Extended cardio’s gotta go, people!

“Contrary to popular belief, extended extreme cardio, such as marathon running, actually sets in motion inflammatory mechanisms that damage your heart. So while your heart is indeed designed to work very hard, and will be strengthened from doing so, it’s only designed to do so intermittently, and for short periods—not for an hour or more at a time. This is the natural body mechanics you tap into when you perform HIIT.

Repeatedly and consistently overwhelming your heart by long distance marathon running, for example, can actually prematurely age your heart and make you more vulnerable to irregular heart rhythm. This is why you sometimes hear of seasoned endurance athletes dropping dead from cardiac arrest during a race. I ran long distance for over four decades. So please learn from my experience and don’t make the same mistake I did.

Compelling and ever-mounting research shows that the ideal form of exercise is short bursts of high intensity exercise. Not only does it beat conventional cardio as the most effective and efficient form of exercise, it also provides health benefits you simply cannot get from regular aerobics, such as a tremendous boost in human growth hormone (HGH), aka the ‘fitness hormone.'” Dr. Joseph Mercola

Related Link Here

Progesterone – A Key Component of Good Health

Not many people realize how important a role progesterone plays in overall good health. See the whole article for specific lists of benefits.

“Progesterone is a steroid hormone made by a woman’s ovaries when she ovulates and in smaller amounts by the adrenal gland. A menstruating woman will typically produce about 20 to 30 mg of progesterone a day during the luteal or last phase of her menstrual cycle.

While menopause doesn’t typically occur until age 50 or later, many women can start going out of balance in their 30s or even earlier. This decline in progesterone is not trivial for as women age into their fourth, fifth, and sixth decade, their progesterone levels continue to fall.  By the time they reach perimenopause as much as 75% or more of their youthful progesterone secretion may already be missing.

Natural progesterone is very useful to balance excess estrogen which can be a major risk for breast cancer. Natural progesterone is also different from estrogen in that your body can use it as a precursor or starting material to make other hormones such as adrenal hormones. It can even convert it into estrogen or testosterone if your body needs it.

Natural progesterone is made from a substance called diosgenin which is commonly extracted from wild yams or soybeans.  Even though it may be extracted from soy it is a highly purified hormone and there are absolutely no remnants of soy substances that would lead to any problem.” Dr. Joseph Mercola

Related Link Here

Pacing Purgatory

Some days there’s no other description for what Dr. Myhill has tagged “pacing” … an essential component of the CFS/ME daily survival reality. Along with a ridiculously long list of supplements I can’t do without, there’s this lil thing called pacing. It can often be described as purgatory. Some docs say a CFSer should rest 3 minutes for every 1 minute of activity. O.o That leaves no time for an actual life and makes a ton of sense if you’re in the worst of the CFS badlands. Fortunately, I’m not there. But, I’ve been close to the edge of that horrible wasteland and have had to up the pacing realities. So, what does it mean? It means I’m up and working for a few hours and then on the couch with the laptop. Or without it, flat on my back staring out at the trees and sunshine. Or I’m in a chair under those trees. Last week, I went bowling with my daughter on her birthday. I was described as graceful and fluid in motion. But. What did it feel like? My knees almost buckled 3 times. My upper body was screaming, my back howling and my legs literally shaking. How do you hide this? You sit down as soon as you’ve taken your turn.  You breathe deeply, sip at the water you brought and refuse to panic.

Seriously.

The result? 3 days on the couch with occasional outbursts of here and thereness, popping Ibuprofen (it’s against my nutrition religion to do that but i do it when desperate), rubbing magnesium oil on the pain-filled limbs and riding the wave of agony.

Put this in perspective. What kind of person am I? The running/sprinting, take me to the river, up the mountain, down the beach and to the bowling alley, down the bike trail type. Oh and there are the random dance fests. I miss it all. And I have not had the chance to really fully cultivate who I am outside of this purgatory, when things weren’t as bad as they’ve been for this almost 6 year stretch. Why? Because this “syndrome” (insert expletives here) has been part of my life since my early 20s. That’s 20++ years.

So. How does someone in purgatory find the meaningfulness in it all? Well…there’s this river perpetually flowing beneath the surface of every moment, and under trees and in the breezes blowing by, in the conversations filled with heart and soul, baring vulnerability and frustration, joy and longing. We’re here for these pleasures, and for the honor of meeting the challenges love tosses our way from time to time. But some times only a raging ranting session of frustration venting proportions will do. Pacing the emotions…pacing the body…corralling the longing into deeper appreciation for everything from birdsong to treespeak to…