High Intensity Exercise

Extended cardio’s gotta go, people!

“Contrary to popular belief, extended extreme cardio, such as marathon running, actually sets in motion inflammatory mechanisms that damage your heart. So while your heart is indeed designed to work very hard, and will be strengthened from doing so, it’s only designed to do so intermittently, and for short periods—not for an hour or more at a time. This is the natural body mechanics you tap into when you perform HIIT.

Repeatedly and consistently overwhelming your heart by long distance marathon running, for example, can actually prematurely age your heart and make you more vulnerable to irregular heart rhythm. This is why you sometimes hear of seasoned endurance athletes dropping dead from cardiac arrest during a race. I ran long distance for over four decades. So please learn from my experience and don’t make the same mistake I did.

Compelling and ever-mounting research shows that the ideal form of exercise is short bursts of high intensity exercise. Not only does it beat conventional cardio as the most effective and efficient form of exercise, it also provides health benefits you simply cannot get from regular aerobics, such as a tremendous boost in human growth hormone (HGH), aka the ‘fitness hormone.'” Dr. Joseph Mercola

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Resistance Training

Resistance training’s a must ‘though not necessarily anywhere in the ballpark of what I’ve been able to re-claim for myself. But it’s coming. In the meantime, check out Mercola’s latest nugget on the subject.

“While resistance training will improve muscle and bone strength, which can help prevent falls and fractures, mounting research also shows that strength training can have a profoundly beneficial impact on your brain as well. Brawn and brains are not mutually exclusive, it turns out… In one study, seniors doing progressive resistance training twice a week for one year experienced a marked improvement in their cognitive ability, scoring up to 13 percent higher in tests relating to decision making.

Strength training increases your body’s production of growth factors, which are responsible for cellular growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Some of these growth factors also promote the growth, differentiation, and survival of neurons, which helps explain why working your muscles also benefits your brain.” Dr. Mercola

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Comprehensive Compound Muscle Movement

When my body’s not being held hostage by the worst of CFS, I prefer to use the T-Tapp approach for fitness. Check the introductory video below.

Note: If you are struggling with CFS, muscle exhaustion is not a goal you want to strive for at this time. There’s “struggling with CFS” and then there’s being on top of it, where you can fatigue or work out your muscles regularly. If you’re in the struggle zone, then you determine what’s best for preserving muscle function without exacerbating the situation. I’m currently working my way back up to the 15 minute routine. Maddeningly slowly.

Doctors with expert advice for CFS/ME sufferers recommend establishing some basic, sustained improvements (good sleep, optimal eating, supplements, tests, stress management, pacing) before embarking on any fitness routine.